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Written publications

This series aims to make our published findings easy to access and understand — for everyone.

Whenever possible, we try to publish our findings in open access journals. Even so, academic articles can be long, full of jargon, and difficult to read.

We believe that this knowledge belongs to everyone. After all, the W3 Project aims to support peer-led responses — whether or not they have an academic background.

With this purpose in mind, the posts in this series take some of our most important written publications and talk about them in plain English.

If you’re looking for a more complete list of our written publications, please visit our Publications page.

This series aims to make our published findings easy to access and understand — for everyone.

Whenever possible, we try to publish our findings in open access journals. Even so, academic articles can be long, full of jargon, and difficult to read.

We believe that this knowledge belongs to everyone. After all, the W3 Project aims to support peer-led responses — whether or not they have an academic background.

With this purpose in mind, the posts in this series take some of our most important written publications and talk about them in plain English.

W3 Guest Author

Drug user organisations can help influence policy to achieve hepatitis C elimination, but they need a supportive policy environment to do so. Co-authors and peer workers Charles Henderson and Annie Madden share their thoughts on the important messages in this paper.

W3 Framework

An impact analysis of the W3 Project reveals that the W3 Framework helps evidence replace a sense of ‘believing’ that peer-led actions work.

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