People who use drugs

People who use drugs (PWUD) are central to public health responses to the issues that affect their health.

This series includes content:

  • Written by peer workers and other staff from PWUD peer responses
  • About PWUD’s peer work
  • About how PWUD peer responses are using the W3 Framework in their work
  • To help provide better services for PWUD

People who use drugs (PWUD) are central to public health responses to the issues that affect their health.

This series includes content:

  • Written by peer workers and other staff from PWUD peer responses
  • About PWUD’s peer work
  • About how PWUD peer responses are using the W3 Framework in their work
  • To help provide better services for PWUD

People who use drugs (PWUD) — particularly people who inject drugs (PWID) — play a critical role in the HIV and hepatitis C responses.

The W3 Project is proud to have close, sustained partnerships with peer-led PWUD organisations across Australia. Peer workers who use drugs have been involved in every facet of the W3 Project, from planning and prioritising to carrying out the research, analysing data, and co-authoring publications.

From peers workers and other peer response staff​

W3 Guest Author

Drug user organisations can help influence policy to achieve hepatitis C elimination, but they need a supportive policy environment to do so. Co-authors and peer workers Charles Henderson and Annie Madden share their thoughts on the important messages in this paper.

From the W3 Project team

W3 Framework

Stage 2 of the W3 Project trialled the W3 Framework in peer-led PLHIV and PWUD organisations in Victoria, Australia.

W3 Framework

This project focussed on converting peer insights from peers who use drugs into resources for Australia’s hepatitis C response.

W3 Framework

An impact analysis of the W3 Project reveals that the W3 Framework helps evidence replace a sense of ‘believing’ that peer-led actions work.

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